7 Essential Details for Suits

In the blink of an eye January, 2015 has come and gone. We know you’re busy, so here are the most essential details you ought to know about men’s suits… Educate yourself, then take your wardrobe and career to the next level with the personal assistance of The SF Tailor.

fitted shoulders1. Given the opportunity, always opt for custom made or bespoke.
Nothing will fit you better. Nothing will give you the same amount of confidence. Don’t fool yourself. If you don’t have accurate measurements, visit an alterations service and get your stats in minutes… and typically for free.

2. A good fit starts with the shoulders.
If you send unusual measurements when you place an order with The SF Tailor, we will confirm them. We want to craft the best possible fit an online tailor can provide you. We’ve already minimized the overhead, passing along our cost savings to you.

3. Lapels should match the width of your torso.
Only wear peaked lapel suits if you are relatively fit, as they accentuate your torso. A slender chest needs skinnier lapels.

4. Opt for sleeves cuffsa quarter-inch (0.63 cm) longer than your jacket sleeve.
This is a hallmark of a well made, well-thought customized suit. If you’re a man of shorter proportions, expose a half-inch (1.27 cm) of shirt cuff. It’ll make your arms appear longer.

5. Cuffs look traditional on suit pants and add weight to the fabric.
As an extension of this, your trousers will drape better. Again if you are not average height, trousers that sit high on the waist and ‘break’ atop shoes also lengthen the body. Uncuff those trouser hems.

complimentary (diagonally across) colors to mix and match6. When wearing a tie, three patterns rarely work together. Choose two solids and a pattern, or a solid and two patterns.

If you don’t have the knack or aptitude to pair colors, use a color wheel when mixing and matching. To use the wheel, choose colors that are diagonal or complementary. The colors should form an equilateral triangle (three equal sides).

7.  When using a wide spread collar, wear a half Windsor or full Windsor tie knot.
The former is also known as the single Windsor knot. It works well with light- and medium-weight fabrics to produce a neat, triangular knot (smaller than the full Windsor). The technique only brings the tie around the loop on one side, not both. Watch a video demonstration, here. 

Full Windsor KnotThe full or double Windsor is pictured here. It produces a wide symmetrical triangular knot. Watch a video demonstration, here.

Now that you’re better informed, The SF Tailor team can personalize your suits and prime you for your job promotion.

3 thoughts on “7 Essential Details for Suits

  1. Aileen

    I have learn several excellent stuff here. Certainly worth bookmarking for revisiting.

    I surprise how a lot effort you put to make this type
    of great informative web site.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>