Dapper but Not Disabled

photo credit trustedpartner.comDear SF Tailor,

 

After a car accident, I faced several physical challenges and depression. With the support of family and friends, I focused on surviving. And as long as I’ve had my wheelchair, I’ve known what I’m capable of doing — but other people don’t know til they get to know me.

This summer the only disappointment from my internship was suiting up for work. It was first time I had to wear professional clothes, which didn’t fit me well. I felt self-conscious. I want to look good and I want people to look at my wardrobe, not my wheelchair.  

After I cross the graduation stage this December, I want to look as confident as I feel during job interviews and on the job. — Dapper but Not Disabled in Denver

Dear Dapper but Not Disabled in Denver,

First, thanks for contacting us. We’re inspired by the obstacles you’ve overcome during physical recovery.

Second, congrats on graduation! Don’t be anxious about interviews. We are happy to custom tailor a suit, so you make a great first impression — and always look your best. Since fit and proportion is critical, measurements should be taken in your chair, not lying down. Then you can use our online tools to customize your 2-piece bespoke suit.

Your body may be beyond your control, but your sense of style isn’t. In fact it becomes more meaningful and essential in retaining your dignity. — Fiona Jarvis

Here are 4 style hacks to draw eyes to your face, so people focus on what you say:

    • Trousers with broad cuffs demonstrate your attention to detail.
      Ignoring your ankles can suggest you’re sloppy and inattentive. Because you haven’t always used a wheelchair, note that sitting trousers are 3-4 inches longer than standard trousers. So you may want to add 3 inches to a previous length of up to 31 inches, 4 inches for a previous length of 33 inches or longer.
    • A vest or waistcoat can hide your waistline, showing off a broad chest and shoulders.
      These physical assets project strength and confidence.

Embrace who you are. Be comfortable with your character. Job applicants tailor their talking points to their skills, talents and potential. By law interviewers cannot ask you about your disability. Why not impress them and bring a functional disability statement; the American Foundation for the Blind recommends these tips.

Again we appreciate the privilege to dress you. Good luck with the job search!

— The SF Tailor

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